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The Dying Keats: A Case for Euthanasia? Brian Livesley

The Dying Keats: A Case for Euthanasia?

Brian Livesley

Published November 1st 2009
ISBN : 9781848761711
Paperback
56 pages
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 About the Book 

As claims for negligence, failures in medical care, and the fears of many about dying lead to repeated cries for the legalisation of euthanasia, the avoidable and prolonged suffering John Keats endured before he died in 1821 is particularly relevantMoreAs claims for negligence, failures in medical care, and the fears of many about dying lead to repeated cries for the legalisation of euthanasia, the avoidable and prolonged suffering John Keats endured before he died in 1821 is particularly relevant today. This publication raises several questions and aims to stimulate an appropriate debate, leading to better recognition by all professionals at the bedside that dying is a clinical diagnosis requiring action. Once this is understood the needs of affected patients and their relatives can be earlier and more appropriately addressed. Those who are dying should not have to undergo the Keatsian experience. They, as well as their relatives and friends, should know that palliative care properly delivered can mean the end of unendurable distress in lifes last weeks, days, and hours. Indeed, no person dying in the United Kingdom today should have to seek legalised euthanasia to be comfortable. Since 1969 the John Keats Biennial Memorial Lecture has been supported in London by Guys Hospital, the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, and the Royal College of Surgeons of England. This twentieth lecture of the series, on which this book is based, was given at Guys Hospital on 23 February 2009 by Brian Livesley MD FRCP, Emeritus Professor in the Care of the Elderly at Imperial College, London University.